Stock Watchlist: Checking in on Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. (NYSE:MMC) Levels

Separating the winners from the losers is a constant challenge for investors. Many focused investors may look to track stock momentum based on historical prices. Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. (NYSE:MMC) currently has a 6 month price index of 1.14280. The six month price index is calculated by dividing the current share price by the share price six months ago. A ratio over one represents an increase in the stock price over the six month time frame. A ratio under one shows that the price has lowered over that defined time period.

Investors are always trying to get an advantage in the equity market. Everyone wants to find that next great stock pick that provides a solid boost to the portfolio. Investors often identify risk preference when trying to sort out asset allocation. In general, a higher amount of risk may offer a greater potential for growth. Many investors may struggle with the concept of leaving emotion out of picking stocks. Equity research may involve a high degree of patience, determination, and lots of homework. Learning everything possible about the markets can help the individual investor better navigate the waters. As the old saying goes, knowledge is power. Being able to filter through the data to determine what is relevant information may assist the investor with making those tough investment decisions.

We can also take a look at some stock volatility data on shares of Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. (NYSE:MMC). The 12 month volatility is currently 13.180500. The 6 month volatility is noted at 13.657900, and the 3 month is recorded at 14.633400. When following the volatility of a stock, investors may be challenged with trying to decipher the correct combination of risk-reward to help maximize returns. As with any strategy, it is important to carefully consider risk and other market factors that might be in play when examining stock volatility levels.

Investors may be looking at the Piotroski F-Score when doing value analysis. The F-Score was developed to help find company stocks that have solid fundamentals, and to separate out weaker companies. Piotroski’s F-Score uses nine tests based on company financial statements. Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. (NYSE:MMC) currently has a Piotroski F-Score of 8. One point is given for piece of criteria that is met. Typically, a stock with a high score of 8 or 9 would be seen as strong, and a stock scoring on the lower end between 0 and 2 would be viewed as weaker.

Shifting gears, Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. (NYSE:MMC) has an FCF quality score of 12.779732. The free quality score helps estimate the stability of free cash flow. FCF quality is calculated as the 12 ltm cash flow per share over the average of the cash flow numbers. When reviewing this score, it is generally thought that the lower the ratio, the better. Presently, Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. has an FCF score of 0.745098. The FCF score is determined by merging free cash flow stability with free cash flow growth. In general, a higher FCF score value would represent high free cash flow growth. Monitoring FCF information may help provide some excellent insight on the financial health of a specific company.

Investors might want to take a look at shares of Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. (NYSE:MMC) from a different angle. Let’s take a peek at the current Q.i. (Liquidity) Value. Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. has a Q.i. value of 34.00000. This value ranks stocks using EBITDA yield, FCF yield, earnings yield and liquidity ratios. The Q.i. value may help identify companies that are undervalued. A larger value would indicate low turnover and a higher chance of shares being priced incorrectly. A lower value may show larger traded value meaning more sell-side analysts may track the company leading to a lesser chance that shares are priced improperly.

Occasionally, a certain stock may perform much higher than expectations, and it may become a much greater percentage of the portfolio. This is typically a good thing, but it may require some decisions on what to do with the portfolio allocations. If one stock is making up a high percentage of the total, it may create the risk of higher than normal average losses if the shares take an unforeseen dive lower. Even if the stock has the potential to go much higher, it can be tricky to know when to sell and find other stocks that might be a better value. Selling a winner might leave the average investor frustrated if the stock goes higher, but there may be nothing wrong with taking profits and not leaving gains on the table. As we move into the second half of the year, investors may want to compare first half gains with goals that were established at the beginning of the year. This may help narrow in on what needs to be done in order to stay in the green for the rest of the year and beyond. Setting portfolio goals may be a good way to stay the course when things get a little hairy in the markets.

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